July 31, 2014

Back Pain + Stroke = Disaster

I herniated a disc in my back and had sciatica 20 years ago so I've been stretching my back for years.  After my stroke I was worried my back pain would come back.  It did.  A recent bout of back spasms taught me stretching my back every morning is not enough.  Freezing in place when a back spasm hits and hoping I can walk slowly to sit down without dropping my cane is scary. 

My PT showed me I arch my back because my abdominal muscles on my paralyzed side are weak (bottom half of red line on left).  To stop myself from falling forwards while standing I lean back (top half of red line).  I also arch my back every time I lift my leg to walk.  Leg muscles (small arrow pointing upwards) need a stable base to pull on.  Abdominal muscles (arrows pointing downwards) are suppose to hold the pelvis and spine still when my leg moves.  

It gets worse.  I discovered I arch my back when I lean down to pick up an object, like when I reach down to get a pot from a bottom cabinet, get milk from the bottom shelf of the refrigerator, or pick up something from the floor.  I arch my back when I wash a dish because I am leaning my stomach on the edge of the counter for support.  

My PT taught me to do leg lifts with bent rather than straight knees.  I decided to intensify the workout.  I clasp my hands together, lift both arms over head, and lift my head while twisting to the left until my right shoulder blade lifts off the bed.  Before I start doing a leg lift I press my low back against the mattress and take a deep breath.  When I move I slowly let my breath out through pursed lips.  Holding my breath would increase my blood pressure.  I was dismayed that my NDT certification course did not teach that hand function comes from my gut.

Bottom Line: It takes both stretching my tight back and strengthening my weak abdominals to keep back spasms away.