August 13, 2017

Meaningful Activities Make My Brain Ache

My presentation has been accepted for an OT conference.
I have presented at nine OT conferences and am determined to find a better way to carry the laptop I need for my Power Point presentation.  I cannot trust my hemiplegic hand to carry a tote bag.  I bought a child-size backpack which saves weight but creates problems.  I refused to go to a store to don a child's backpack with a cartoon character on it.  When a backpack arrived in the mail I realized the straps are too short.  This makes it difficult to put on and take off.  The straps are also slippery so they frequently slip off my hemiplegic shoulder.  This requires frequent stops because I have to put my cane down to push the strap back up where it belongs.  As the photo shows, this tiny backpack is barely big enough for the laptop and is too small for papers I collect at conferences.

Enter a new backpack - still child size, but the straps are longer and padded.  I rehearsed putting this backpack on and walking around to see if the strap stays on my hemiplegic shoulder.  The straps are great.  It is tall enough for me to put 8.5 by 11 inch papers inside.  My laptop slides easily to the bottom.  Yeh!


Bottom-Line: Participating in meaningful activities after a stroke requires detailed problem solving that makes my brain ache.
I was willing to do the work described above because presenting at conferences validates that what I have learned from having a stroke is valuable.  Unlike parents of young children who will eventually be able to stop packing a mountain of supplies to get out of the house, I will never be able to stop planning before I do a new activity.  Click on the "rehearsal" label below to see other examples of problem solving before participating in community activities.

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